A Penchant for Travelling

Just sharing travel experiences……

Port Arthur Day Tour Part II: Tasman National Park

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After a quick tour of Richmond, we continued our journey to Tasman National Park, via Dunalley, a small fishing village on the east coast of Tasmania. Dunalley is smaller town compared to Richmond, with a population of 313 as at 2006 population census. It is located on the narrow isthmus which separates the Forestier and Tasman Peninsulas from rest of Tasmania. Nothing much in Dunalley to show you, except probably the “Spirit of the Wedgetail” bronze sculpture on the side of the Arthur Highway.

"Spirit of the Wedgetail" bronze sculpture

“Spirit of the Wedgetail” bronze sculpture

According to Wikipedia, Dunalley was badly affected by bushfires on 4 January 2013, with the town losing about 65 structures, including the Police Station, school, bakery and local residences. Probably that’s why the town looked even more deserted…

A short drive from Dunalley is the beautiful Tasman National Park where we had stunning views of the eastern coastline of Tasmania. We first arrived at the northern end of the park via the Blowhole Road which took us to the interesting Doo Town – a holiday village within the locality of Eaglehawk Neck near Port Arthur where the house names contain “doo”. I did not take any photos as we sat in the bus throughout with James pointing out the more interesting house names as we drove through, so the photos would be blur through the window in such misty weather. Some of the house names include: “Just Doo It”, “Doodle Doo”, “Doo Drop In”, “Doo Us” etc. Apparently there used to be a house called “Doo Fuck All” but somehow it disappeared, probably the name was too controversial so it was removed? :P

After this interesting drive-through, we continued to the Tasmans Arch and Devils Kitchen.

Beautiful Tasman National Park lookout to the Pirates Bay

Beautiful Tasman National Park lookout to the Pirates Bay

Tasmans Arch

Tasmans Arch

Spectacular view from the next lookout

Spectacular view from the next lookout

Devil's Kitchen

Devil’s Kitchen

Tasmans Arch is what is left of the roof of a large sea cave or tunnel, that was created by wave action over many thousands of years. This arch will eventually collapse due to the continuing slow process of erosion and form another “Devil’s Kitchen”, like you see in the photo above. A “Devil’s Kitchen” is formed after the collapse of a cave roof. It is one of several such coastal landforms in the Tasman National Park that have developed in the Permian-age siltstone.

Soon, it was time for one of Tasmania’s 60 great short walks at Waterfall Bay, 1.7km one way, a relatively easy walk with occasional gentle hill sections. We were given about an hour to do the walk and was told that the bus would be waiting for us at the end of the walk. Waterfall Bay offers a spectacular view across the cliff-lined bay to a waterfall which, after rain, plummets straight into the sea. Below are some of the better photos taken during my walk…

View from the first lookout along the Waterfall Bay Walk

View from the first lookout along the Waterfall Bay Walk

Love this pic of the couple in red walking on the "autumn-filled" track

Love this pic of the couple in red walking on the “autumn-filled” track

View from another lookout

View of Waterfall Bay

Patersons Arch

Patersons Arch

Unique standalone cliff formation, not sure what it is called

Unique standalone cliff formation, not sure what it is called

The ground was wet from showers throughout the day as well as past few days I believe, thus we had to be careful during the walk so as not to step into muddy grounds and slip. Nonetheless, with such spectacular views of the Tasman Peninsula on top of some of the highest sea cliffs in Australia, it was a great walk to warm ourselves up in the chilly weather. :)

I shall continue the rest of the day tour at Port Arthur in the last part soon…

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