Salamanca Market

Every Saturday, the Salamanca Market – one of Australia’s largest and most vibrant outdoor markets promising an authentic Tasmanian experience, is open from 8.30am to 3pm between the lawns and historic buildings of Salamanca Place, near Hobart City’s waterfront. First held on 22 January 1972, Salamanca Market has grown from a dozen informal traders to nearly 300 licensed traders now. There are also a selection of registered casual traders every week, where most of them are located at the west end of Salamanca Place.

Getting to Salamanca Market is pretty easy as there is a free Hobart Hopper shuttle bus every Saturday from 8.30am to 4pm at 10-min interval.

Free Hobart Hopper Shuttle Bus route map

Free Hobart Hopper Shuttle Bus route map

The nearest bus stop is only a few minutes walk from my hotel, at Argyle Street Car Park, near the Woolworths supermarket. When I boarded the bus around 9.30am, there was only 1 other passenger on the bus. Within 10 min of bus ride, I reached Salamanca Market.

View of the Salamanca Market from the bus stop I alighted

Stitched view from the Salamanca Market bus stop

Salamanca Market gigantic map

Salamanca Market gigantic map

There were already a lot of visitors in the market although it was only 9.40am on a Saturday morning. Guess we all had a common purpose – to visit the more than 300 stalls for the local fresh produce, the warm aroma of a coffee and croissant, as well as handmade local products, while enjoying the performance by buskers singing the blues, stroking a harp or strumming a lively folk song. Share some photos here so that you can also feel the vibrant Tasmanian market. 🙂

Buskers performing in the middle of the market

Buskers performing at Gladstone Street, a designated busking area

IMG_0735

Beautiful Mt Wellington in the background

Beautiful Mt Wellington in the background

"Bee" busker performing in front of Salamanca Place, a popular place for restaurants & bars at night

“Bee” busker performing in front of Salamanca Square, a popular place for restaurants & bars at night

I was feeling a bit hungry after checking out the numerous stalls for about 2 hours in the huge market and the shops at Salamanca Square. So I bought a salmon sausage with foccacia bun (A$7, abt S$8.25) from Silver Hill Fisch, and a cup of cappuccino (A$3.50, abt S$4.10) from a casual trader stall (my guess, because it was not listed on the map).

My Salmon Sausage with Foccacia Bun at Silver Hill Fisch stall

My Salmon Sausage with Foccacia Bun at Silver Hill Fisch stall

The cappuccino was quite aromatic and nice. As for the salmon sausage bun, I wasn’t sure what they added to the salmon sausage, but it tasted a bit funny. I like the foccacia bun though, very fragrant and chewable. There were also a lot of greens in the bun, I like! I settled down and enjoyed my brunch along the lawn just next to Salamanca Market with many birds and people resting after exploring the market.

Beautiful park by the market

Beautiful park by the market

I left the market after around 3.5 hours of fun and bought home 3 types of local produce – chocolate fudge from the House of Fudge (Stall #75 towards the west end of the market), fruit jam from Country Larder Preserves (Stall #102 near the circle along Gladstone Street) and manuka honey from Tasiliquid Gold Honey (Stall #15 towards the west end of the market). There were also several stalls selling local handmade glass jewellery so I also bought several pairs of earrings home. Again when I took the free Hobart Hopper shuttle bus back to the city, there was only 1 other passenger on the bus. This time I was able to take a picture of the bus before I boarded, for future reference:

The free Hobart Hopper shuttle bus

The free Hobart Hopper shuttle bus

It was time well spent at the Salamanca Market, no wonder it is Tasmania’s most visited attraction! I would definitely make sure I am in Hobart on a Saturday should I visit the city again!

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